I am proud to introduce to you all out there on the web, the most unique project of my college Architecture career.  

To begin, my colleagues and I have taken it upon ourselves to explores the fusion of art, music and food within the constants of a shipping container.  

Please follow our design, development, permitting and implementation as we push to create a mobile venue that will exist within the City of San Francisco, CA in the coming years.  

Connect with us on Facebook, Watch the progress.  

https://www.facebook.com/pages/FM-Venue/377300805631638

You can also email us @ fmvenue@gmail.com

John Brisbee

DJ Spooky_Michael Hebb // Night Life

(Source: onepotblog.blogspot.com)

Greg Tran - Harvard GSD Thesis Prize Winner 2011

I love seeing the construction side of the project.  

(Source: semigoods.com)

Situated on the boundary and extending into both sides, the intervention creates a point of connection through the insertion of a Scrap Metal Refinery, an art studio run by two artists who collaborate with both residential and industrial community. The artists work closely with the automobile repair center and Dunkirk’s residence to produce art work. Cars are dismantled and elements are extracted for resale or recycled for the metal workshop. Artists working with Dunkirk’s residence use recycled car parts to create art work, displayed on the residential side. Unused metal at the workshop is then sent to the local scrap yard.

The proposal aims to mediate the two disconnected sides of Dunkirk through creating new opportunities for the residential community to be involved in the creative process of metal works.

(Source: jisoohan.co.uk)

This preview for an independent film called Henry Waltz, by Emil Goodman, is hard to decipher on a narrative level, but it unfolds in a Jasper Morello-like world of steampunk shadow puppets and wireframe cities on circular space frames, with underwater crystal submarines and fluttering machine-butterflies crossing monstrous landscapes. Humans in motorized glass domes chase one another through a maze of iron columns—which is where something like a plot must lie, though it’s hard to tell exactly what it might be. Read more on the Henry Waltz website, including a link to this short making-of video.

Design Principle: Tom Kundig

Location: Seattle, WA 2002

The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas. Physically, that neighborhood birthplace of invention, the garage, provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw, hot-rolled steel sheets.

(Source: olsonkundigarchitects.com)